5 most hated Phillies players of all time

While plenty of players are remembered fondly by Phillies fans, some are hated and despised and may be forever. Who are the most hated players in the organization's history?

St. Louis Cardinals v Pittsburgh Pirates
St. Louis Cardinals v Pittsburgh Pirates / George Gojkovich/GettyImages
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No. 4: Scott Rolen

Scott Rolen appeared like he would be an integral part of the club's rebuild toward being a contender. He debuted for the Phillies in August 1996. In his first full season in the majors the following year, he won the National League Rookie of the Year Award.

Rolen did not get along with Phillies manager Larry Bowa, who became the skipper in 2001. The third baseman believed the organization was not doing all it could to become a contender. He rejected a hefty extension from the Phillies during the offseason following the 2001 season as he grew tired of the team's promises to put a better team around him to contend.

The Phillies ended up trading Rolen, minor league pitcher Doug Nickle, and cash to the St. Louis Cardinals for third baseman Placido Polanco, starting pitcher Bud Smith, and reliever Mike Timlin on July 29, 2002.

While it appears some of the Philly fanbase have moved on from their dislike of the third baseman following his entry into the Phillies Wall of Fame last season, his comments during his unhappiness with the organization made many fans angry with him for the duration of his playing career.

No. 3: Jonathan Papelbon

Jonathan Papelbon became the Phillies' all-time leader in saves during his tenure with the ballclub from 2012 to 2015. While he was good in his role throughout his playing career, his opinionated and controversial nature was vexing for some fans.

Following a 2014 outing in which he exited after blowing a save, the reliever chose an inopportune time to adjust his cup as it appeared he made a rude gesture in response to a booing crowd at Citizens Bank Park. Papelbon ended up being ejected from the contest by umpire Joe West and subsequently received a seven-game suspension.

Papelbon was unhappy with former general manager Ruben Amaro Jr., as the reliever signed with the organization to contend for a championship. Instead, the club had an aging core that began to show signs of decline from its years of competing. The closer didn't hold back in his criticisms of the organization during his time with the team or in comments made over the last couple of years.