Every number retired by the Philadelphia Phillies

PHILADELPHIA, PA - CIRCA 1980: Pitcher Steve Carlton #32 of the Philadelphia Phillies pitches during an Major League Baseball game circa 1980 at Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Carlton played for the Phillies from 1972-86. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - CIRCA 1980: Pitcher Steve Carlton #32 of the Philadelphia Phillies pitches during an Major League Baseball game circa 1980 at Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Carlton played for the Phillies from 1972-86. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images) /
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Phillies Dick Allen
PHILADELPHIA, PA – CIRCA 1968: Dick Allen #15 of the Philadelphia Phillies bats during an Major League Baseball game circa 1968 at Connie Mack Stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Allen played for the Phillies from 1963-69 and 1975-76. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images) /

Dick Allen, No. 15

What sets Dick Allen apart from everyone else on this list is that he’s not in the Baseball Hall of Fame. It’s a long overdue and egregious error that needs to be rectified.

In fact, Allen’s number was retired in 2020 because Phillies owner John Middleton felt that the franchise should honor Allen, since the Hall was not.

In 1964, the young Phillie won NL Rookie of the Year, leading MLB in runs scored and triples. He was an All-Star the next three seasons. Allen’s 43.1 offensive WAR still ranks seventh among Phillies players, and his .530 slugging percentage and 153 OPS+ are fourth.

Mike Schmidt, No. 20

Unsurprisingly, the greatest third baseman in baseball history made the cut.

He’s the Phillies’ all-time leader in position player WAR, offensive WAR, and defensive WAR, games played, runs scored, total bases, home runs, RBI, walks, and a host of other offensive metrics.

Over his magnificent 18-year career, Schmidt was a 12-time All-Star, 10-time Gold Glove third baseman, six-time Silver Slugger, three-time MVP, and led the Phillies to their first World Series championship in 1980. He’s a member of the 500 HR club, and was the 26th candidate in MLB history to be elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year on the ballot.

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