Every number retired by the Philadelphia Phillies

PHILADELPHIA, PA - CIRCA 1980: Pitcher Steve Carlton #32 of the Philadelphia Phillies pitches during an Major League Baseball game circa 1980 at Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Carlton played for the Phillies from 1972-86. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - CIRCA 1980: Pitcher Steve Carlton #32 of the Philadelphia Phillies pitches during an Major League Baseball game circa 1980 at Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Carlton played for the Phillies from 1972-86. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images) /
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Steve Carlton, Phillies
PITTSBURGH, PA – 1974: Pitcher Steve Carlton #32 of the Philadelphia Phillies throws a pitch during a game in 1974 against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh, PA. Steve Carlton played for 14 years with the Philadelphia Phillies and for 6 different teams over 24 years. Steve Carlton was a 10-time All-Star,won the Cy Young award 4 times and was a inducted to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1994.(Photo by: 1974 SPX/Diamond Images/Getty Images) /

Steve Carlton, No. 32

As the first pitcher in MLB history to win four Cy Young Awards, Steve Carlton pitched his way onto the wall like no one before him.

In a pleasant turn of events, Carlton was acquired in a rare successful trade for the Phillies, who got him from the St. Louis Cardinals ahead of the 1972 season. Over 15 seasons with the Phillies, Carlton posted a 3.09 ERA over 499 starts, including 185 complete games.

Carlton and Mike Schmidt led the Phillies to five division titles, and two pennants, including their first-ever championship season in 1980, and back to the World Series in 1983.

Roy Halladay, No. 34

The late, great Roy Halladay wasn’t in Philly very long, but he made the most of his four seasons with the club, winning the 2010 Cy Young award and leading MLB with 21 wins in his first season, adding two All-Star Games to his resumé, and helping the Phillies to their fourth and fifth consecutive division titles in 2010 and 2011. They haven’t won the division since.

On May 29, 2010, Halladay threw the second perfect game in franchise history (Jim Bunning’s was the first). That fall, in the NLDS, he became just the second pitcher in MLB history to throw a no-hitter in the postseason.

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