The ultimate Phillies Field of Dreams starting nine

Aug 12, 2021; Dyersville, Iowa, USA; The right field foul pole from behind the corn for the game between the Chicago White Sox and the New York Yankees at Field of Dreams. Mandatory Credit: Reese Strickland-USA TODAY Sports
Aug 12, 2021; Dyersville, Iowa, USA; The right field foul pole from behind the corn for the game between the Chicago White Sox and the New York Yankees at Field of Dreams. Mandatory Credit: Reese Strickland-USA TODAY Sports /
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Phillies Field of Dreams outfield

Phillies Dick Allen
PHILADELPHIA, PA – CIRCA 1968: Dick Allen #15 of the Philadelphia Phillies bats during a Major League Baseball game circa 1968 at Connie Mack Stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Allen played for the Phillies from 1963-69 and 1975-76. (Photo by Focus on Sport/Getty Images) /

Bobby Abreu

Bobby Abreu spent more time with the Phillies than any other team in his 18-year career. Over nine seasons in Philly, he amassed 1,474 hits, 348 doubles, 42 triples, 195 home runs, 814 RBI, and 253 stolen bases. He also won his only Gold Glove and Silver Slugger awards of his career as a Phillie.

Abreu is one of seven players in MLB history with 900+ extra-base hits and 400+ stolen bases, and the only Phillie, though Tris Speaker and Honus Wagner also achieved the feat for Pennsylvania teams (the Athletics and Pirates). Abreu’s speed would be beneficial in the Iowa outfield, and he’d probably be the fastest one through a corn maze, too.

Richie Ashburn

Ashburn is the Phillies’ all-time hits leader among outfielders, and it doesn’t even come close. He finished his career with 2,217 hits, almost double runner-up Tony Gonzalez’s 1,110. Ashburn wasn’t a power-hitter, but he won the batting title twice and was a six-time All-Star.

Over 12 seasons with the Phillies, Ashburn led MLB and/or the NL in a variety of categories including stolen bases, hits, triples, walks, batting average, OBP, at-bats, plate appearances, and games played.

Dick Allen

Dick Allen, who passed away in December 2020, should be considered one of the greatest players in Phillies history, and he should be in the Hall of Fame. He played third, first, and left field for the Phillies.

As a minor leaguer in the Phillies’ system, he endured vile racism and death threats, just like his favorite player growing up, Jackie Robinson. The Phillies were the last NL team to integrate, though Allen was not their first Black player. He had actually grown up in Pennsylvania, but the racism he experienced in the Phillies’ minor league system in Arkansas had him considering quitting the team.

Allen went on to become one of the greatest rookies in franchise history and won NL Rookie of the Year with the team in 1964. Over 866 games with the Phillies between 1963-69, Allen hit .300/.380/.554 with a .933 OPS, 966 hits, 177 home runs, and 544 RBI.

Unfortunately, Phillies fans were not kind to Allen, and booed him mercilessly throughout his time with the team, despite his offensive prowess. He eventually made it known that he wanted to be traded, and inadvertently became part of Curt Flood’s labor crusade when Flood refused to report to the Phillies in Allen’s stead.

Allen returned to the Phillies in 1975 for two seasons but wasn’t the same player he had been. He wasn’t an easy player to have on the roster, but the Phillies also underpaid him, and the fans made him miserable, which soured one of the best offensive careers in franchise history.

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