Philadelphia Phillies: Top 6 blowout wins all-time vs. Reds

Andrew McCutchen #22, Matt Joyce #7, and J.T. Realmuto #10 of the Philadelphia Phillies (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images)
Andrew McCutchen #22, Matt Joyce #7, and J.T. Realmuto #10 of the Philadelphia Phillies (Photo by Dylan Buell/Getty Images) /
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Elmer Flick of the Philadelphia Phillies (Photo by Mark Rucker/Transcendental Graphics/Getty Images)
Elmer Flick of the Philadelphia Phillies (Photo by Mark Rucker/Transcendental Graphics/Getty Images) /

June 24, 1901: Phillies 19, Reds 1

This late-June contest between the Phillies and Reds was a makeup game, rescheduled from a May 29 rainout. More than 5,000 fans in attendance at the Baker Bowl saw a quick two-hour game, despite 20 combined runs being scored. The Phils accounted for all but one of those runs.

The Phils got things going early in the first inning, facing Reds starting pitcher RHP Bill Phillips — who ended up tossing a complete game, despite allowing 22 hits, 19 runs, 10 earned runs, four walks, and a home run across eight innings and 54 batters faced.

The Phillies scored three runs in the opening frame, two in the second, six in the fourth, three in the fifth, and five in the seventh. In addition to outhitting the Reds, 22-5, their opposition recorded a glaringly bad six errors. The best-performing Philadelphia batter was right fielder Elmer Flick, who went 3-for-5 with three runs scored, a double, triple, five RBI, and one walks across six plate appearances.

Phillies left-handed pitcher Doc White, who ended up winning the 1906 World Series with the Chicago White Sox, went the distance as well. In nine innings, he allowed just five hits, one run, and one walk, while striking out seven of his 33 batters faced. Even White got involved at the plate, logging four hits in six plate appearances, including a home run.

The Reds struck out seven times in the game, while the Phils only struck out four times. It was just a different sport back then.

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