Phillies Franchise History: Greatest Player to Wear Each Number

PHILADELPHIA, PA - AUGUST 09: Former Philadelphia Phillies greats, Jim Bunning, Steve Carlton and Mike Schmidt were among many on hand to honor former manager Charlie Manuel who was to be inducted to the Phillies Wall of Fame during a ceremony before the start of a game against the New York Mets at Citizens Bank Park on August 9, 2014 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Rich Schultz/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - AUGUST 09: Former Philadelphia Phillies greats, Jim Bunning, Steve Carlton and Mike Schmidt were among many on hand to honor former manager Charlie Manuel who was to be inducted to the Phillies Wall of Fame during a ceremony before the start of a game against the New York Mets at Citizens Bank Park on August 9, 2014 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Rich Schultz/Getty Images) /
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. . Randy Wolf. 43. team. 6.

A homegrown lefty drafted in the second round of the 1997 MLB Draft, Randy Wolf was one of the Phillies best pitchers in the early 2000s, supported by “The Wolf Pack” in the top bleachers at Veteran’s Stadium.

Los Angeles originally selected Wolf, a California native, in the 25th round in 1996 out of El Camino Real High School in Woodland Hills. Wolf turned down the offer to play for Pepperdine University in Malibu, the same school that would produce Dan Haren and Eric Thames.

Wolf made a quick jump to the majors, appearing in his first game as a Phillie in June 1999. He stuck as a starter and would have four consecutive seasons with double-digit wins. including a 16-win season in 2003 when he made his lone All-Star game.

On April 12, 2004, Wolf became the first pitcher to start in Citizens Bank Park, ushering in a new era of Phillies baseball.

In 2005 Wolf underwent Tommy John surgery, limiting him to just 13 games that season and 12 the next, in what would be his final season as a Phillie.

Wolf went on to pitch for the Dodgers, Brewers, Padres, Tigers, Marlins, and Orioles over a 16-year career that only recently ended in 2015 with a two-year hiatus following a second Tommy John surgery.

As a member of the Brewers Wolf threw the slowest recorded pitch in Major League Baseball history by a starting pitcher after tossing up a 49 MPH curveball in 2012.

Wolf retired after signing a ceremonial one-day contract with the Phillies in 2015, and is 10th in franchise history with 971 strikeouts.

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