Phillies Franchise History: Greatest Player to Wear Each Number

PHILADELPHIA, PA - AUGUST 09: Former Philadelphia Phillies greats, Jim Bunning, Steve Carlton and Mike Schmidt were among many on hand to honor former manager Charlie Manuel who was to be inducted to the Phillies Wall of Fame during a ceremony before the start of a game against the New York Mets at Citizens Bank Park on August 9, 2014 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Rich Schultz/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - AUGUST 09: Former Philadelphia Phillies greats, Jim Bunning, Steve Carlton and Mike Schmidt were among many on hand to honor former manager Charlie Manuel who was to be inducted to the Phillies Wall of Fame during a ceremony before the start of a game against the New York Mets at Citizens Bank Park on August 9, 2014 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Rich Schultz/Getty Images) /
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PHILADELPHIA – APRIL 8: Statues are shown outside Veterans Stadium before the Philadelphia Phillies game against the Chicago Cubs on April 8, 2001 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images) /

. . . Granny Hamner. 2. team. 6

Despite wearing eight different numbers over 16 seasons with the Phillies, Granny Hamner was known for wearing number two for the majority of his career. A member of the Whiz Kids during the 1950s, Hamner started at shortstop and second for Philadelphia, hitting .263 with 1,518 hits, 103 home runs, and 705 RBI.

Hamner joined Philadelphia at the age of 17 with players serving in World War II.

Earning three-consecutive All-Star selections in the early 50s, Hamner had 510 hits in that three-year stretch. He earned MVP votes six times, and finished sixth in 1950 when the Phillies won only their second National League pennant since their inaugural season in 1883 as the Quakers.

Despite Hamner hitting .429 with a 1.181 OPS the Phillies were swept by Yogi Berra and the Yankees during the World Series. That series would be the only playoff appearance for Hamner and the Whiz Kids, and begin a 27-year playoff drought.

Two years after losing the World Series, Hamner was named the captain of the Phillies, a title that no longer serves a role in baseball. He’d be inducted onto the Phillies Wall of Fame in 1987, nearly 30 years after his final game in Phillies red and grey.

Hamner is eighth in Phillies history with 5,772 at-bats, 10th in singles with 1,083, and tied with Del Ennis for first in double plays grounded into with 171.

Few others who wore the number two had careers that matched the productivity and longevity of Hamner in Philadelphia. Not Ben Revere, not Rod Barajas, and, at least not yet, not J.P. Crawford.

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