Top individual Phillies seasons ages 35 and over

ATLANTA - APRIL 22: Jamie Moyer #50 of the Philiadelphia Phillies against the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field on April 22, 2010 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
ATLANTA - APRIL 22: Jamie Moyer #50 of the Philiadelphia Phillies against the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field on April 22, 2010 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images) /
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MIAMI, FL – JULY 13: A detailed view of a Philadelphia Phillies batting helmet in the dugout before the start of the game against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park on July 13, 2018 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL – JULY 13: A detailed view of a Philadelphia Phillies batting helmet in the dugout before the start of the game against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park on July 13, 2018 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images) /

Starting pitcher: Steve Carlton (1980 and 1982, ages 35 and 37)

Arguably the greatest pitcher in franchise history and one of the top left-handed starters of all-time, Carlton had two of his best seasons later in his career.

Carlton had already won two Cy Young Awards, the first being his remarkable 1972 campaign, winning 27 with a 1.97 ERA, 310 strikeouts and 30 complete games. The second was in 1977 when he won 23 with 17 complete games and a 2.64 ERA.

During the 1980 World Series championship season, Carlton put together another season for the ages. In 38 starts, logged 304 innings, won 24 and struck out 286, all career highs.  Carlton also posted a slim 2.34 ERA with 13 complete games and three shutouts. He went 3-0 in the playoffs, giving up seven earned runs while striking out 17 batters in 27.1 innings.

If three Cy Young Awards weren’t enough, how about a fourth at the age of 37? That’s what Carlton did in 1982. He started 38 games, completed 19, won 23, had six shutouts and 295 2/3 innings and 286 strikeouts, all leading the league.

Carlton went on to lead the league in innings pitched and strikeouts in 1983. He won 13 games with a 3.58 ERA as a 39-year old in 1984 before injuries took their toll on the future Hall of Famer.

He pitched for the most part ineffectively from 1985 through the beginning of 1988 with the Phillies, Giants, Indians, and Twins before retiring with 329 wins (11th all time), 55 shutouts and 4136 strikeouts (4th all time).

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